Current reading

I was going to re-read de Waal’s Seeking God: The Way of St Benedict, but I got sidetracked when my copy of Praying the Bible: An Introduction to Lectio Divina suddenly turned up one day.  It’s filled to the brim with references to the fathers and their remarkable, even astounding, praise of the Bible.

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5 thoughts on “Current reading

  1. “Seeking God” is truly a classic for those who want to dive below the surface of things Benedictine. It’s been around for quite a while, too, right? I’m thinking it was first published in the 1980’s. I remember hearing it read during dinner when I made one of my retreats at Mount Saviour Monastery near Elmira NY. That was back when I only had two children, and could find time (and money) for an annual retreat.

    You are indeed correct about “Praying the Bible” (written by a Benedictine, for anyone who didn’t click the link). I think I was introduced to it by one of your blog posts a number of years ago. I can only read three or four pages before I find myself enthusiastically diving into Sacred Scripture itself.

    You also introduced me to “Orthodox Prayer Life,” now one of my favorites, to which I find myself returning frequently for inspiration and reference.

    Keep up the good work, my brother in Christ!
    ~Walt near Scranton PA

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  2. Walt! It’s great to hear from you again! I lost track of your online self a while back, and I’m glad to have found you again. Yes, “Seeking God” is from the 80s, and I recently ran across an interview with the author, Esther de Waal (I blogged about it a few entries back).

    In “Praying the Bible” I just got to the author’s presentation of Guigo II’s notes on lectio – reading, meditation, prayer, contemplation – and then I read the psalms and canticle of this morning’s office the way he recommended: slowly, even word-by-word, pausing after each word or short phrase, giving the text time to coalesce and link to other texts I’ve read and avoiding the rush of curiosity. The ancients were deep old coves.

    I don’t recall “Orthodox Prayer Life”, but I’ve noticed nowadays that there are some things that really did happen in the past that I don’t recall…

    My next purchase will probably be an English translation of a patristic work mentioned in “Praying the Bible”, but I don’t know which one yet. But I’ll be sure to give “Orthodox Prayer Life” a good look, too – it’s now on my wish list.

    Anyways, thanks for commenting! I’ve subscribed to your blog in google reader, and circled you (or whatever it’s called) in g+.

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  3. Good for you! Btw, how is today (Borromeo?) your feast day?

    Another Q. Do you have any experience with Tanquerey’s “The Spiritual Life”? I recently acquired a copy, based on the recommendation of a priest friend. Every 3 or 4 years, he uses it as his Lenten study. It looks somewhat daunting, almost like a textbook, but I don’t want to pre-judge. I don’t see it referenced often on the net very often. Thought perhaps you’ve read it, and may have some insight.

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  4. I’m *Charles* William White, Jr. – my Dad was Chuck, so I’m Bill.

    I thought I had a copy of Tanquerey, but I can’t find it. [later…] A ha! See http://www.archive.org/details/MN41530ucmf_5 (readable scans of an old microfilm, also available as a pdf file). I haven’t read any of it since 1998 when I was going to typeset the text files from EWTN, but I recall it being regarded as solid, thorough and good.

    Now that I page through it, it looks very good. It seems rather more scholastic than monastic, but it’s certainly worth looking through. Thanks for mentioning it!

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